Bale sends an S.O.S

first_imgThe MLS seems to be the best solution for Bale, by language, quality of life and possibility of playing golf, his great hobby. In the conversation unveiled now, even one of the participants even shouts: “Miami!”, In clear reference to the franchise that is now owned by Beckham, Inter Miami. Bale was already one step away from going to play in the Chinese Super League, at Jiangsu Suning, because Madrid opened the door for him last summer. Between China and the US, the choice for Bale is clear. The key is that Madrid does not charge a transfer and that they manage to pay their high salary … The sad reality is that last summer only that offer came from China by the player. So Barnett exclaims, “If anyone wants it!” The Hat-trick Potcast presented by the International Champions Cup. The first episode of this podcast of the great summer competition he served Gareth Bale to send an SOS about his situation at Real Madrid. With a contract until 2022 and a salary of 14.5 million euros that he does not want to lower, does not count for Zidane and must search for equipment. Madrid needs to lose weight in the face of the crisis that is coming due to the coronavirus. There are more soccer players like James, Mariano or Odriozola who are in the same situation …The podcast became a kind of promotional video for the Welshman. The question about MLS in which the Welsh player says “I would definitely be interested” has spread to all corners of the world. What has not transpired are the last seconds of the video of the interview that can be seen on YouTube, in which the request for help is already more evident. The interview includes Charlie Stillitano, executive producer of the International Champions Cup, Neil Barnett, a year in charge of Chelsea’s communication, and Ray Hudson, a famous American television commentator (from the Bien Sports channel). But, in addition, and this is what had not transpired, the representative of the player, Jonathan Barnett, was online. The key to the video is from minute 34:20. Charlie Stillitano begins to fire the player, and already in a more relaxed atmosphere, he says: “I hope someday you can come to MLS.” That’s when Jonathan Barnett interrupts: “If anyone loves him, Charlie! Someone has to call him first … “. That causes everyone to laugh. And Stillitano continues: “I think there must be many suitors Jonathan, there must be many suitors …”. And, finally, Bale himself enters the conversation: “(Inaudible) happen … That’s the most important thing.” The player seems to want to say: “See if they can make that happen … that’s the most important thing.” Between the representative and the player, a full SOS.(embed) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GHGG6v8k5kI (/ embed)last_img read more

Ancient eclipses show Earths rotation is slowing

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country It’s often said that the heavens run like clockwork. Astronomers can easily predict eclipses, and they can foretell to a fraction of a second when the moon passes in front of a distant star. They can also rewind the clock, and find out when and where these events happened in the past. But a new historical survey of hundreds of eclipses, some dating back to the 8th century B.C.E., finds that they aren’t as predictable as scientists thought. That’s because Earth’s spin is slowing down slightly. Not only that, the study also identifies short-term hiccups in the spin rate that have been missed by cruder models.“There have been about a million days since 720 B.C.,” says Leslie Morrison, an astronomer now retired from the Royal Observatory Greenwich in London. Over such a long time, even a gradual slowdown in Earth’s rotation becomes evident, he notes.To conduct the research, Morrison and his colleagues analyzed the timing and location of eclipses from ancient Greece, China, the Middle East, and other areas worldwide. The oldest event in the catalog, a total solar eclipse that occurred in 720 B.C.E., was observed by astronomers at a site in Babylon (now modern-day Iraq). But, working backward, today’s astronomers would have predicted that the eclipse should have been seen a quarter of a world away, somewhere in the western Atlantic Ocean. The discrepancy means Earth’s rotation has gradually slowed since the 8th century B.C.E.   Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Overall, Earth’s spin has slowed by about 6 hours in the past 2740 years, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society A. That sounds like a lot, but it works out to the duration of a 24-hour day being lengthened by about 1.78 milliseconds over the course of a century.The interaction between ocean tides and Earth’s continents is the biggest factor in slowing Earth down, Morrison explains. As those landmasses get slammed by the seas, Earth loses some rotational momentum. But models considering only this phenomenon suggest that Earth’s rotation should be slowing down more than observed, by about 2.3 milliseconds per day every century.So other factors must be at work, the researchers say. One major influence is the slow rebound of crust that was weighed down by massive ice sheets during the last ice age that have since melted away. Whereas the crust is springing upward at high latitudes, at lower latitudes the planet is shrinking inward. Like an ice skater bringing her arms inward to spin faster, that overall shift of mass is speeding up Earth’s rotation, Morrison says.Superimposed on that long-term trend, though, are small decade-to-decade variations in spin rate. These glitches are apparent from astronomical observations of occultations of stars by the moon—miniature eclipses that occur when the moon passes in front of the distant star. The variations stem from momentum shifts between Earth’s liquid outer core and the solid mantle that overlies it, Morrison explains.Mathieu Dumberry, a planetary scientist at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, who was not involved in the new study, says these momentum exchanges are poorly understood. Nevertheless, he notes, the team’s findings are “a wonderful new piece of evidence that helps us measure the magnitude and direction of such interactions deep within the Earth.”The new data should help scientists better model the movement of liquid iron in the outer core, which gives rise to Earth’s magnetic field, says Duncan Agnew, a geophysicist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, California.Although these small time shifts are important for scientists to consider over geologic timescales, eclipse predictions are still pretty good in the short term. The next total eclipse of the sun will darken a narrow path stretching across the United States next 21 August, give or take a millisecond. Emaillast_img read more